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  LONE PINE KOALA SANCTUARY
  World’s First and Largest Koala Sanctuary

Only 12km from Brisbane City, Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary is the world’s first and largest koala sanctuary with 130 koalas. Hold a koala, hand feed kangaroos and meet a large variety of Australian wildlife in beautiful, natural settings.

OPEN every day over Christmas & New Years.
9am-5pm.
No surcharges apply

Freshwater Crocodiles

Crocodylus johnstoni

Freshwater Crocodiles have a narrow snout, sharp teeth and webbed hind feet. Their body colour is light brown with darker bands on the body and tail, although colour can vary depending on their environment. Freshwater crocodiles will bite if they’re disturbed; however, their jaws are designed to catch fish, not large mammals. Like the larger Estuarine crocodile, Freshwater crocodiles are ambush hunters. Although active during the day, they hunt mainly at night. Their diet consists of fish, crustaceans and insects. As an opportunistic predator, they will also feed upon small mammals, birds and reptiles that venture too close.

Walked with dinosaurs
Crocodiles roamed the Earth at the same time as dinosaurs. Their characteristic snouts, armoured scales, sharp teeth and webbed hind feet have remained relatively unchanged for over 200 million years.

Amphibious life
Found throughout billabongs, rivers and wetlands of Northern Australia, Freshwater Crocodiles are all adapted to an amphibious life. They can hold their breath underwater for up to an hour and swim rapidly by means of their powerful tails. On land, they move very quickly over short distances and can propel themselves at great speed down sloping river banks into the water.

Top of the food chain
Lone Pine is home to Freshwater Crocodiles which are smaller than their saltwater relatives and are recognised by their long, narrow snout. Although active during the day, Freshwater Crocodiles are ambush predators by night, feeding on insects, fish, frogs, lizards and birds.

Did you know? Despite appearances, turtles and birds are more closely related to crocodile than lizards.