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 LONE PINE KOALA SANCTUARY
  World’s First and Largest Koala Sanctuary

 

Red-tailed Black Cockatoo

Calyptorhynchus banksii

‘Mallee’ is one of our beautiful male Red-tailed Black Cockatoos at Lone Pine. He is the offspring of our breeding pair, who are also the proud parents to the first Red-tailed Black Cockatoo to be hatched in captivity in 1989. Mallee has an outgoing personality and enjoys showing off his beautiful wings. 

The Red-tailed Black Cockatoo is a big black parrot with a short crest, a stubby beak and a long tail, which is decorated with beautiful red patches. The tail of the female Red-tailed Black Cockatoo has black bars on the red patches and the head has yellow spots.

The Red-tailed Black Cockatoo is a seed-eater and feeds on native plants including marri, Eucalyptus calophylla, proteas, casuarinas, and stringy-bark Eucalyptus baxteri. Red-tailed Black Cockatoos are diurnal, raucous and noisy, and are often seen flying high overhead in small flocks, sometimes mixed with other cockatoos. Flocks of up to 500 birds are generally only seen in the north or when the birds are concentrated at some food source. Otherwise, they are generally rather shy of humans.

Cockatoo communication
Recognisable by their curved beaks and showy crests, cockatoos communicate using vocalisations and body language, often raising their crests in greeting, excitement or alarm.

Family birds
Red-tailed Black Cockatoos are often seen flying in small flocks, although flocks of up to 200 birds have been sighted in the northern range of distribution. These flocks consist of pairs, family groups, or parties of several family groups.

What’s on the menu?
Red-tailed Black Cockatoos primarily feed high in treetops on eucalyptus seeds, nuts, fruit and occasionally insect larvae.