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LONE PINE KOALA SANCTUARY
200,000 square metres of nature, since 1927

 

 

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Koala Cams

Lone Pine Koala Train 🚂🚃🐨🐨🐨🚃

Koala Train at Main Koala Habitat We have affectionately dubbed this spot the “koala cuddle train” as it has proven a popular place for snuggling up together, especially on chilly mornings. While generally a solitary species, many of the koalas at Lone Pine have grown up together and have formed close bonds with their room-mates (sometimes very close!). Despite having ample options for places to spread out and sleep alone, many koalas choose to sleep close together like this. That being said, each koala has their own unique personality and we have some koalas who prefer to live on their own. 1.The Back-To-Back: When they want to be near each other, but not see each other, the Cuddle Train boys will sit on the same branch, facing in opposite directions with their behinds smooshed together - so comfy! 🐨🐨 2.The Classic Spoon: Often one of our boys will be snoozing in a super-comfortable-looking spot, and another koala will want in. They'll sidle up and snuggle right in behind the first koala. 🐨🐨 3.The Koala Hug: Sometimes even koalas need a hug - from their koala bestie that is! 🐨🐨 4.The Koala Sandwich: Imagine two koalas hugging. Now imagine two koalas hugging with another koala squashed right in the middle. Voilà - you have a koala sandwich. 🐨🐨🐨 5.The Double Decker: Picture this - two koalas holding on to a vertical branch. One is sitting on the other’s head. The one on the bottom doesn’t care. They are comfy, and that is all that matters. 🐨 🐨 6.The Cuddle Train: Imagine a koala, after koala, after koala, after koala. They’re all snuggling in a long line. They are so comfy, and so relaxed. This is it. The big one. The nirvana of koala cuddles – the complete Cuddle Train. 🐨🐨🐨🐨
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Young Koala (Joey) Tracker 🔎🐨

Follows movement in the Koala Joey Habitat
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Koala Forest 🌳🐨🌳🐨🌳

This space here is just part of our expansive 'Koala Forest' exhibit, where a number of our female koalas live. Our Koala Forest is a large, shaded semi-outdoor exhibit, that comes with the added luxury of outdoor air-conditioning, to help keep our little ladies cool during the heat of summer. When the weather is warm, you may see our koalas laying about exposing their chest, or dangly their hands and feet. This is how koalas help stay cool, catching the breeze as it goes by. You may also notice that at certain times of the day, our keepers put down the blinds to keep the hot sun off the koalas. Female koalas are smaller than males and have beautiful, unmarked white chests (males have brown scent glands). They have a pouch where their young develop for the first six months. The pouch faces downwards, just like the pouch of their closest relative, the wombat. Sometimes, our little koala joeys and their mums live in this exhibit. We often have local wildlife chill out in this exhibit too. See if you can spot the cheeky little Butcherbirds, as they come down and sing the koalas an afternoon song.
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Koala Bachelor Pad

While many koalas at Lone Pine are quite happy to live together, and even choose to snuggle up with their roommates (see "Lone Pine Koala Train" cam: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzl... others seem to prefer the solo life. The koala in this exhibit prefers not to share his bachelor pad with any other koalas, and has the whole tree to himself. 🐨🌳 He does sometimes have a possum visitor who nests in a tree hollow, but he doesn't seem to mind this. The building in the background is the Brisbane Koala Science Institute, which houses our koala research lab, library, and interactive education centre where guests can learn all about koalas and the threats facing them in the wild. Visitors to the Brisbane Koala Science Institute can view this koala from the sky-deck. There is also the opportunity to "scrunch and sniff" some eucalyptus leaves on the deck for an immersive experience. Find out more about the research we have been involved in by visiting https://koala.org/. Is that uncomfortable? The fur on koala bottoms are densely packed to ‘cushion’ the branches they sit on, and they have a bony cartilage under the skin which is perfectly formed for sitting in the "V" shape of tree branches. Koalas have white patches on their bottom which help them camouflage, so they are hard to spot from the ground. Multipurpose coat Koalas have a thick, woolly fur. This coat protects them from both hot and cold temperatures and acts like a raincoat during wet weather. The fur varies in colour from light grey to brown with patches of white on the chest and neck, inside arms and legs, and inside the ears. Look at those claws! Koala hands and feet have long sharp claws and thick pads for cushioning. With three fingers and two opposable thumbs on their hands, they have a fantastic grip. On their feet, they have a ‘grooming claw’; the first and second toes are fused together and there are two claws on this toe. They use this claw-like a comb to clean themselves and remove excess fur. Size does matter Male koalas are larger than females. An adult male koala weighs between seven and 14 kilograms whilst females usually weigh between six and 11 kilograms. How long does a koala live? The normal life expectancy of a wild koala is eight to 10 years whilst captive koalas commonly live 12 to 15 years.
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Koala Train - Portrait Format

Koala Train at Main Koala Habitat 🚂🚃🐨🐨🐨🚃 We have affectionately dubbed this spot the “koala cuddle train” as it has proven a popular place for snuggling up together, especially on chilly mornings. While generally a solitary species, many of the koalas at Lone Pine have grown up together and have formed close bonds with their room-mates (sometimes very close!). Despite having ample options for places to spread out and sleep alone, many koalas choose to sleep close together like this. That being said, each koala has their own unique personality and we have some koalas who prefer to live on their own. 1.The Back-To-Back: When they want to be near each other, but not see each other, the Cuddle Train boys will sit on the same branch, facing in opposite directions with their behinds smooshed together - so comfy! 🐨🐨 2.The Classic Spoon: Often one of our boys will be snoozing in a super-comfortable-looking spot, and another koala will want in. They'll sidle up and snuggle right in behind the first koala. 🐨🐨 3.The Koala Hug: Sometimes even koalas need a hug - from their koala bestie that is! 🐨🐨 4.The Koala Sandwich: Imagine two koalas hugging. Now imagine two koalas hugging with another koala squashed right in the middle. Voilà - you have a koala sandwich. 🐨🐨🐨 5.The Double Decker: Picture this - two koalas holding on to a vertical branch. One is sitting on the other’s head. The one on the bottom doesn’t care. They are comfy, and that is all that matters. 🐨 🐨 6.The Cuddle Train: Imagine a koala, after koala, after koala, after koala. They’re all snuggling in a long line. They are so comfy, and so relaxed. This is it. The big one. The nirvana of koala cuddles – the complete Cuddle Train. 🐨🐨🐨🐨 Spotted one of your own cuddle combinations, or a favourite 'koality' moment? Snap a screenshot and email it through to . Each week we'll choose our favourite and send the winner a small koala gift!
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Behind-the-scenes of 'Jumping Joeys' Cam 🐨📷

Meet Head Koala Keeper, Karen, as she introduces some of our boisterous young female koalas and gives some handy tips on what to look out for on our "Jumping Joeys" webcams. 🐨📷 As youngsters, these little koalas tend to be more active and adventurous than the adults. They can often be seen climbing, eating, and even jumping from tree to tree. 🐨↷🐨 Don't miss a minute of adorable action and check out the 24/7 live-streamed webcams here: Jumping Koala Joeys: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TY... Young Koala (Joey) Tracker: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCz...
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Koala Cuddle Train Highlights 🚂🚃🐨🐨🐨🚃

📷View the LIVE cam here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzl... A compilation of some of our favourite cuddles and 'koala-ty' moments from the last few months. 🐨💖🐨 We have affectionately dubbed this spot the “koala cuddle train” as it has proven a popular place for snuggling up together, especially on chilly mornings. While generally a solitary species, many of the koalas at Lone Pine have grown up together and have formed close bonds with their room-mates (sometimes very close!). Despite having ample options for places to spread out and sleep alone, many koalas choose to sleep close together like this.
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Dingo Cams

Dingo Habitat 🐕🐕

In October 2019, we welcomed two new dingoes to the Lone Pine family; Jindy (girl) and Stirling (boy). Born in August 2019, these pups still have a lot of growing and learning to do as they settle into life at the sanctuary. The puppies were bred at the Dingo Discovery Sanctuary and Research Centre located in Victoria, Australia. 🐕🐕 Since arriving, our puppies have completed basic obedience training, crate training, and socialisation with Tanami (our female adult dingo). Training is ongoing, so you may see some of this on the webcam with our mammal keepers. It is very important that our dingoes develop these skills, so that we can safely carry out various procedures such as health checks, vaccinations, nail clipping and veterinary procedures. You may also notice our keepers introducing our pups to various items such as rakes and wheelbarrows, which are used on a daily basis to clean their exhibit. 🧹 Jindy and Stirling love to go for walks throughout the sanctuary, so if you can't spot them in their exhibit, it may be because they are out on adventures. Daily walks are great for not only exercise, but also enrichment and mental stimulation. 🦮🦮 Our puppies reside with Tanami, so you will also see her on camera (she's usually snoozing in the den!). Viewing tip - look up high! Our dingoes may be up on their bridge, which links to two sides of their exhibit, and gives them great views of the sanctuary. To find out how you can help support Jindy the dingo and all of the animals at Lone Pine as an Animal Sponsor, visit our website here: https://koala.net/animal-sponsorshi...
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Dingo Habitat

Our dingo pups, Jindy and Stirling, are now big and grown, but that's not to say we can't reminisce on their early puppy days! 🥰 For your enjoyment, here are 90 seconds of puppy antics clipped from our dingo live cams. Puppy zoomies are, of course, featured. To find out how you can help support Jindy the dingo and all of the animals at Lone Pine as an Animal Sponsor, visit our website here: https://koala.net/animal-sponsorshi...
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Dingo Puppies - Highlight Reel

Our dingo pups, Jindy and Stirling, are now big and grown, but that's not to say we can't reminisce on their early puppy days! 🥰 For your enjoyment, here are 90 seconds of puppy antics clipped from our dingo live cams. Puppy zoomies are, of course, featured. To find out how you can help support Jindy the dingo and all of the animals at Lone Pine as an Animal Sponsor, visit our website here: https://koala.net/animal-sponsorshi... Be sure to check out our live stream to see what they're up to now, along with their best mate and adult dingo, Tanami. 🐕 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQZ...
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Behind-the-scenes of Dingo Cam 🐕📷

Meet Head Mammal Keeper, Rebecca, as she introduces our three lovely dingoes; Stirling, Jindy and Tanami. 🐕🐕🐕 Jindy (female) and Stirling (male) are still playful pups and can often be seen romping around their exhibit and playing chase with one another. They also live with an adult female dingo named Tanami, who sometimes joins in on the fun from time to time, but is also a big fan of taking naps in one of her multiple dens.😴 Our dingo exhibit consists of two large areas that are connected by an elevated walkway so the dingoes have access to both sides. You can keep an eye on both sides on our two dingo webcams which stream live 24/7. 📷The "Dingo Puppy Tracker" webcam is set to track the movement of the dingoes as they explore: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0Q... 📷The other side of the exhibit can be viewed on the "Dingo Habitat" webcam: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmG... To find out how you can help support Jindy the dingo and all of the animals at Lone Pine as an Animal Sponsor, visit our website here: https://koala.net/animal-sponsorshi...
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Reptile Cam- NEW

Skinks and Dragons 🦎🐉

👀 See the world from a reptile's point of view! 👀 In this exhibit, you'll be able to see some of our smaller reptile friends; Hosmer's skinks, Downs bearded dragons, and pygmy mulga monitors. 🦎Hosmer's Skinks🦎 These are the spiky, orange lizards with stubby, rounded snouts. Hosmer’s skinks live in dry rocky outcrops in Queensland and the Northern Territory. When threatened they wedge themselves in between the rocks and puff out their spikey bodies, making them very hard to remove. They give birth to live young, with an average litter of about 4 mini-lizards that look just like their mum. 👶 Hosmer’s skinks live in small colonies with other lizards. 🐉Downs Bearded Dragons 🐉 These lizards have a more rounded head and a long, slender tail. They are mostly grey in colour. The Downs bearded dragon goes by many other names, including Lawson's dragon, dumpy dragon, pygmy dragon, dwarf bearded dragon, and black soil bearded dragon. The name 'Lawson’s dragon' comes from Australian author, poet, and philosopher Henry Lawson. 🦎Pygmy Mulga Monitors🦎 These lizards are long and slender, with a narrow/pointy head. The pygmy mulga monitor (also known as Gillen’s monitor) is an arboreal lizard, meaning it spends a lot of time in trees.🌳 Its prehensile tail makes it well adapted for climbing. They eat insects, eggs, and sometimes small mammals.
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Behind-the-scenes of Perentie Cam 🦎📷

Meet Reptile Keeper Courtney and one of the amazing animals she has the pleasure of looking after, "Hendrix" the perentie. 🦎 Perenties are a type of goanna (an Australian term for a monitor lizard) and can grow up to 2.5 metres in length (8 ft 2 in), making them the largest lizard in Australia, and the fourth largest lizard in the world. 📏 Hendrix is a very intelligent boy who loves to interact with his keepers. He partakes in regular enrichment training sessions to keep him mentally and physically fit, as well as to help out with husbandry practices such as weighing him on a scale and conducting health checks. 🩹🩺 He can frequently be seen sun baking on warm days🌞, or cruising around his exhibit and using his forked tongue to explore different smells. 👃 🦎📷You can catch a "sneak peek" into Hendrix's day-to-day activities thanks to our "Goanna Cam: Perentie" webcam, which live streams all of the action 24/7. Check it out here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aL-... To find out how you can help support Hendrix and all of the animals at Lone Pine as an Animal Sponsor, visit our website here: https://koala.net/animal-sponsorshi...
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Skinks & Dragons

See the world from a reptile's point of view! In this exhibit, you'll be able to see some of our smaller reptile friends; Hosmer's skinks, Downs bearded dragons, and pygmy mulga monitors. 

Hosmer’s skinks live in dry rocky outcrops in Queensland and the Northern Territory. When threatened they wedge themselves in between the rocks and puff out their spikey bodies, making them very hard to remove. They give birth to live young, with an average litter of about 4 mini-lizards that look just like their mum. Hosmer’s skinks live in small colonies.

The Downs bearded dragon goes by many other names, including Lawson's dragon, dumpy dragon, pygmy dragon, dwarf bearded dragon, and black soil bearded dragon. The name 'Lawson’s dragon' comes from Australian author, poet, and philosopher Henry Lawson.

The pygmy mulga monitor (also known as Gillen’s monitor) is an arboreal lizard, meaning it spends a lot of time in trees. Its prehensile tail makes it well adapted for climbing. They eat insects, eggs, and sometimes small mammals.

 


Platypus Cams

Platypus Habitat 🦆➕🐿️

Here you can catch the live antics of our two platypodes, Barak and Aroona. As both of our platypodes are male, and predominantly solitary animals, they each have their own large exhibit to enjoy. They like to switch every now and then, so some days you'll see Barak in here; other days, Aroona. You can tell if it is Barak, as he has more white patches across his bill, but you'll have to be quick to spot it! The water in our platypus tanks is cooled using geothermal energy. This means that we use the earth's underground cooling properties to keep the water at a platypus-approved 22 degrees Celsius. The roof of our Platypus House also holds one of the sanctuary's largest solar power grids. At times, you may notice that our platypus seems to be following the same swimming route. This is because when underwater, platypus close their eyes and use electro-sensors in their bill to locate prey. If circling a particular area, it could be that they have sensed their prey and are trying to hone in on the exact location. Our platypodes enjoy a varied diet including yabbies (crayfish), mealworms and fly pupae. To find out how you can help support Aroona the platypus and all of the animals at Lone Pine as an Animal Sponsor, visit our website here: https://koala.net/animal-sponsorshi...
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Barak & Aroona

Here you can catch the live antics of our two platypodes, Barak and Aroona. 

As both of our platypodes are male, and predominantly solitary animals, they each have their own large exhibit to enjoy. They like to switch every now and then, so some days you'll see Barak in here; other days, Aroona. You can tell if it is Barak, as he has more white patches across his bill, but you'll have to be quick to spot it! 

The water in our platypus tanks is cooled using geothermal energy. This means that we use the earth's underground cooling properties to keep the water at a platypus-approved 22 degrees Celsius. The roof of our Platypus House also holds one of the sanctuary's largest solar power grids. 

At times, you may notice that our platypus seems to be following the same swimming route. This is because when underwater, platypus close their eyes and use electro-sensors in their bill to locate prey. If circling a particular area, it could be that they have sensed their prey and are trying to hone in on the exact location. Our platypodes enjoy a varied diet including yabbies (crayfish), mealworms and fly pupae.

 


Lone Pine Stories

Do you want to learn more about how we care for animals at Lone Pine? Or learn more about our eco initiatives? Check out these videos to discover something new.

Poppy, the milk-drunk koala joey 🍼🐨

Meet Poppy. She is an 8-month-old, strong-willed, little go-getter koala joey. 🐨💪 Poppy is the daughter of the lovely Rusa, who is a wonderful mum but unfortunately isn’t producing quite enough milk to support her growing baby. To help Poppy along, she receives a milk feed twice a day from Keeper Karen (in this video) or our head vet, Dr. Galit. 🍼 Being little Miss Independent, Poppy likes to try and hold the syringe to feed herself. If it wasn’t for Keeper Karen steadying the pace, she would eat way too much before she realises her tummy is full! Watch until the end for the cutest milk-drunk joey snuggles of all time (cue: ‘awwwww’). 💓💓 To find out how you can help support Poppy and all of the animals at Lone Pine as an Animal Sponsor, visit our website here: https://koala.net/animal-sponsorshi... #lonepinekoala #koalajoey #wildlife #AnimalsAtHome #keepercam #visitbrisbane #thisisqueensland #seeaustralia
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Dingo puppies arrive at Lone Pine, Brisbane, Australia

Get to know our dingo puppies, Jindy & Stirling
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Eucalyptus plantation & feeding 130 koalas

Providing the best nutrition for an animal requires an in-depth understanding of their particular dietary requirements. Here at Lone Pine, we are responsible for achieving this for not one, but around 130 of some of the pickiest eaters in the animal world; koalas. So, what exactly is involved in keeping these discerning diners satisfied?
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Dingoes play in new habitat

A new habit with ramps, ponds, bridges and hills was worth the effort
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Enriching raptors' lives with robots

Robot falcons fly with real raptors at Lone Pine. We are all about our wildlife having interesting, challenging experiences that use their natural skills.
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Lone Pine's Inaugural Eco Day

Our very first Eco Day was held in December 2019 and was a great success. Eco Day was a day of celebrating, and connecting people with, green initiatives, activities, information and local businesses. Like us on Facebook to receive updates about Eco Day 2020!
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Live Q&A with Keeper Karen 🐨

Keeper Karen is a wealth of knowledge when it comes to koalas, and answered all of your pressing koala questions!
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Poppy the Koala - Tummy Scratches 🐨

Who said a visit to the vet was a bad thing because it certainly wasn't Poppy! Even as a tiny youngster, Poppy loved nothing more than a tummy scratch after a milk feed. 🥰 By the look of that little milk-drunk face, it seems as though Dr Galit has her scritching skills down pat. 👌 #lonepinekoala #koala #koalajoey #wildlife #throwback #milkdrunk #scritches #visitbrisbane #thisisqueensland #seeaustralia
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